Wisconsin Collaborative for Quality Healthcare

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MEASURES CLINICAL TOPIC MEASURE TYPE IOM IMPROVEMENT AIM Rollover for more information
Medical Group
Adolescent Immunization Status For the general community, high childhood immunization rates prevent the resurgence of many infectious diseases, such as polio, that have been virtually eradicated from most developed countries (CDC, 1999). The general clinical consensus is that if immunization practices ceased, most infectious and contagious diseases currently prevented by vaccinations would reemerge as lethal health threats. Potential for exposure to infectious disease is even greater with the increase in international travel. By ensuring proper immunization of adolescents, organizations can help contain the transmission of these diseases and help protect the general population. This measure assesses the percentage of adolescents who had each of the following immunizations by their 13th birthday: One dose of meningococcal vaccine AND, One tetanus, diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) OR, One tetanus, diphtheria toxoids vaccine (Td) This is a measure developed by the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ).Preventive CareMedical GroupEffectiveness
Childhood Immunization Status For the general community, high childhood immunization rates prevent the resurgence of many infectious diseases, such as polio, that have been virtually eradicated from most developed countries (CDC, 1999). The general clinical consensus is that if immunization practices ceased, most infectious and contagious diseases currently prevented by vaccinations would reemerge as lethal health threats. Potential for exposure to infectious disease is even greater with the increase in international travel. By ensuring proper immunization of children by the age of two, health organizations can help contain the transmission of these diseases and help protect the general population. This measure assesses completion of the Primary Childhood Series for children age two who have had each of the following immunizations: *Four Diphtheria Tetanus and Acellular Pertussis (DTaP) *Three Polio (IPV) *One Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) *Three H influenza Type B (HiB) *Three Hepatitis B (Hep B) *One Chicken Pox/Varicella (VZV) *Four Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV)  This is a measure developed by the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ).Preventive CareMedical GroupEffectiveness
Well Child Visit First 15 Months of Life This measure is based on the CMS and American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) visits which outlines the following benefits of Well-Child Visits: *Prevention. Your child gets scheduled immunizations to prevent illness. You also can ask your pediatrician about nutrition and safety in the home and at school. *Tracking growth and development. See how much your child has grown in the time since your last visit, and talk with your doctor about your childs development. You can discuss your childs milestones, social behaviors and learning. *Raising concerns. Make a list of topics you want to talk about with your childs pediatrician such as development, behavior, sleep, eating or getting along with other family members. Bring your top three to five questions or concerns with you to talk with your pediatrician at the start of the visit. *Team approach. Regular visits create strong, trustworthy relationships among pediatrician, parent and child. The AAP recommends well-child visits as a way for pediatricians and parents to serve the needs of children. This team approach helps develop optimal physical, mental and social health of a child. * It is recommended that visits in the first 15 months of life occur at the following ages: By 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months, 12 months and 15 months.

This measure assesses the percentage of pediatric patients who turned 15 months old during the measurement period and who had six or more well-child visits with a PCP during their first 15 months of life (by their 15 month birthday).

 New Measure! This is a measure developed by the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ).
Preventive CareMedical GroupEffectiveness
CLINIC
Adolescent Immunization Status For the general community, high childhood immunization rates prevent the resurgence of many infectious diseases, such as polio, that have been virtually eradicated from most developed countries (CDC, 1999). The general clinical consensus is that if immunization practices ceased, most infectious and contagious diseases currently prevented by vaccinations would reemerge as lethal health threats. Potential for exposure to infectious disease is even greater with the increase in international travel. By ensuring proper immunization of adolescents, organizations can help contain the transmission of these diseases and help protect the general population. This measure assesses the percentage of adolescents who had each of the following immunizations by their 13th birthday: One dose of meningococcal vaccine AND, One tetanus, diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) OR, One tetanus, diphtheria toxoids vaccine (Td) This is a measure developed by the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ).Preventive Care ClinicEffectiveness
Childhood Immunization Status For the general community, high childhood immunization rates prevent the resurgence of many infectious diseases, such as polio, that have been virtually eradicated from most developed countries (CDC, 1999). The general clinical consensus is that if immunization practices ceased, most infectious and contagious diseases currently prevented by vaccinations would reemerge as lethal health threats. Potential for exposure to infectious disease is even greater with the increase in international travel. By ensuring proper immunization of children by the age of two, health organizations can help contain the transmission of these diseases and help protect the general population. This measure assesses completion of the Primary Childhood Series for children age two who have had each of the following immunizations: *Four Diphtheria Tetanus and Acellular Pertussis (DTaP) *Three Polio (IPV) *One Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) *Three H influenza Type B (HiB) *Three Hepatitis B (Hep B) *One Chicken Pox/Varicella (VZV) *Four Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV)  This is a measure developed by the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ).Preventive Care ClinicEffectiveness
Well Child Visit First 15 Months of Life This measure is based on the CMS and American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) visits which outlines the following benefits of Well-Child Visits: *Prevention. Your child gets scheduled immunizations to prevent illness. You also can ask your pediatrician about nutrition and safety in the home and at school. *Tracking growth and development. See how much your child has grown in the time since your last visit, and talk with your doctor about your childs development. You can discuss your childs milestones, social behaviors and learning. *Raising concerns. Make a list of topics you want to talk about with your childs pediatrician such as development, behavior, sleep, eating or getting along with other family members. Bring your top three to five questions or concerns with you to talk with your pediatrician at the start of the visit. *Team approach. Regular visits create strong, trustworthy relationships among pediatrician, parent and child. The AAP recommends well-child visits as a way for pediatricians and parents to serve the needs of children. This team approach helps develop optimal physical, mental and social health of a child. * It is recommended that visits in the first 15 months of life occur at the following ages: By 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months, 12 months and 15 months.

This measure assesses the percentage of pediatric patients who turned 15 months old during the measurement period and who had six or more well-child visits with a PCP during their first 15 months of life (by their 15 month birthday).

 New Measure! This is a measure developed by the Wisconsin Collaborative for Healthcare Quality (WCHQ).
Preventive Care ClinicEffectiveness