Wisconsin Collaborative for Quality Healthcare

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WCHQ Measures Summary Report

This report shows a health system's most current results for all WCHQ performance measures.



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* Benchmark: For those measures with multiple result categories displayed on one bar, the benchmark applies to "Good Control" for A1C Control and LDL Control measures, and to "Two or More Tests" for Blood Sugar (A1C) Testing. The default benchmark is the top performer. This can be changed by selecting a different benchmark from the drop-down.

** Rank: For those measures with multiple result categories displayed on one bar, the rank is based on "Good Control" for A1C Control and LDL Control measures, and to "Two or More Tests" for Blood Sugar (A1C) Testing.

 
Benchmark
Good Control
(or BMI Normal)
Fair to Poor
Control (or BMI
Above Normal)
Uncontrolled
(or BMI Below Normal)
Not Tested
 
Two or More Tests One Test  
 
Percentage of Patients Meeting the Measure Criteria  

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Chronic Care  
Measure Rank **

Controlling High Blood Pressure: Blood Pressure Control Hypertension (high blood pressure) affects approximately 50 million individuals in the United States. "Essential Hypertension" is diagnosed when no specific cause for the elevated blood pressure can be found. A normal blood pressure for most adults is less than 120/80 mm Hg. High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, renal disease and stroke. Controlling one's blood pressure can help prevent these diseases. This measure assesses the percentage of patients 18-85 years of age who have a diagnosis of essential hypertension and whose blood pressure was adequately controlled based on the the eighth report of the Joint National Committee treatment goals of: *Less than 140/90 for patients less than 60 years of age or patients of any age with a diagnosis of diabetes and/or chronic kidney disease. *Less than 150/90 for patients 60 years of age and older without diabetes or chronic kidney disease.
Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Diabetes: All-or-None Outcome Measure (Optimal Control)  Diabetes All-or-None Measures. The Diabetes All-or-None Measures are two separate measures, one for process (optimal testing) and one for outcomes (optimal results). Each measure contains three goals. All three goals within a measure must be reached in order to meet that measure. The numerator of each all-or-none measure is collected from the organizations total diabetes denominator. Using the diabetes denominator optimal results includes: * Most recent A1C test result is less than than 8.0% AND * Most recent blood pressure measurement is less than 140/90 mm Hg AND * Tobacco Non-User AND * Daily Aspirin or Other Antiplatelet for Diabetes Patients with Ischemic Vascular Disease Unless Contraindicated AND * Statin Use for patients ages 40 through 75 or patients with IVD of any age. Why use an All-or-None method? This method was chosen because of the benefits it provides to both the patient and the practitioner. First, this methodology more closely reflects the interests and likely desires of the patient. With the data collected in two scores (optimal testing and optimal results), patients can easily look and see how their provider group is performing on these criteria rather than trying to make sense of multiple scores on individual measures. Second, this method represents a systems perspective emphasizing the importance of optimal care through a patients entire healthcare experience. Third, this method gives a more sensitive scale for improvement. For those organizations scoring high marks on individual measures, the All-or-None measure will give room for benchmarks and additional improvements to be made. Nolan T, Berwick DM. All-or-none measurement raises the bar on performance. JAMA. 2006 Mar 8;295(10):1168-70.
Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Diabetes: Blood Pressure Control Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality for individuals with diabetes. It is also a major contributor to morbidity and direct and indirect costs of diabetes. Studies have shown the benefits of reducing cardiovascular risk factors in preventing or slowing cardiovascular disease. In an effort to align with the National Quality Forum (NQF) endorsed diabetes measures, and referencing the 2013 American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines it is recommended that people with diabetes have a blood pressure measured at every routine diabetes visit and that the systolic blood pressure is less than 140 mmHg and the diastolic blood pressure is less than 90 mmHg. This measure assesses the percentage of patients 18-75 whose most recent blood pressure reading within the measurement period is controlled to a rate of less than 140/90 mmHg.
Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Diabetes: Blood Sugar (A1c) Control In an effort to align with National Quality Forum (NQF) endorsed diabetes measures, and referencing the 2013 American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines, the following A1C Control goals for people with diabetes are measured by the WCHQ: Good Control - A1c level controlled to less than 8.0%, Fair to Poor Control - A1c greater than or equal to 8.0% and less than or equal to 9.0%, Uncontrolled - A1c greater than 9.0%, No A1c test within the measurement period
Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A
The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Diabetes: Blood Sugar (A1c) Testing Good glycemic control for people with diabetes is cost-effective and improves quality of life. The A1c test has become the gold standard for assessing and monitoring glycemic control. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) strongly recommends that people with diabetes have two A1c tests annually, at a minimum. This measure assesses the percentage of patients 18 to 75 years of age with a diagnosis of diabetes who had two or more A1c tests, one A1c test, or no A1c tests within the measurement year.
Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Diabetes: Kidney Function Monitored Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease in the United States. Early detection and intervention, along with improved glycemic and blood pressure control, can help reduce the risk of the development and progression of kidney disease. The measure shows the percent of people 18 to 75 years of age with a diagnosis of diabetes who were screened and/or monitored for kidney disease in the measurement year.
Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Diabetes: Statin Use Unless Contraindicated In November 2013, The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Task Force on Practice Guidelines released updated guidance for the treatment of blood cholesterol. The new recommendations remove treatment targets for LDL-C for the primary or secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and recommend high or moderate intensity statin therapy based on patient risk factors. Four major stain benefit groups were identified and diabetics age 40 to 75 years, regardless of LDL-C level and without clinical ASCVD are one of the identified groups.
Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Ischemic Vascular Disease: Blood Pressure Control There has been important evidence from clinical trials that further supports and broadens the merits of risk-reduction therapies for patients with established coronary and other atherosclerotic vascular disease, including peripheral arterial disease, atherosclerotic aortic disease, and carotid artery disease. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that a blood pressure is measured at every routine visit and that the systolic blood pressure is less than 140 mmHg and the diastolic blood pressure is less than 90 mmHg. This measure shows the percentage of people 18-75 years of age with a diagnosis of IVD whose most recent blood pressure reading within the measurement period is controlled to a rate of less than 140/90 mmHg.
Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance
Preventive Care  
Measure Rank **

Chlamydia Screening in Women Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) cause significant morbidity and mortality in the United States each year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 19 million new infections occur annually in the United States, almost one half of which occur in persons 15 to 24 years of age.

Chlamydia is a common STD that can infect both men and women. It can cause serious, permanent damage to a woman's reproductive system, making it difficult or impossible for her to get pregnant later on. Chlamydia can also cause a potentially fatal ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy that occurs outside the womb).

Because chlamydia is usually asymptomatic, screening is necessary to identify most infections. Screening programs have been demonstrated to reduce rates of adverse secondary consequences in women. CDC recommends yearly chlamydia screening of all sexually active women younger than 25.

This measure assesses women 16 through 24 years of age identified as sexually active who had at least one test for chlamydia during the 12-month measurement period.

Q1 2016 - Q4 2016

N/A The number of patients or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance
Patient Experience - Visit Results  
Measure Rank **

Getting Timely Appointments, Care, and Information Patients were asked how often they were able to get an appointment for care as soon as it was needed and received timely answers to questions when they called the office. Patients were also asked how often they saw the doctor within 15 minutes of their appointment time. The score shows how often patients answered Always to these specific questions.
2015 Patient Experience

N/A The number of surveys or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

How Well Providers Communicate Patients were asked if their doctors explained things in a way that was easy to understand, listened carefully, gave easy to understand instructions, knew important information about their medical history, showed respect, and spent enough time with the patient. The score shows how often patients answered Yes, definitely to these specific questions.
2015 Patient Experience

N/A The number of surveys or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Helpful, Courteous, and Respectful Office Staff Patients were asked if office staff were helpful and if they were courteous and respectful. The score shows how often patients answered Yes, definitely to these specific questions.
2015 Patient Experience

N/A The number of surveys or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Follow Up on Test Results Patients were asked if someone from the doctors office followed up to give them the results of a blood test, x-ray, or other test when it was ordered by the doctor. The score shows how often patients answered Yes, definitely to this specific question.
2015 Patient Experience

N/A The number of surveys or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Rating the Provider a "9" or "10" on a 0-10 Scale Patients were asked to rate their doctors on a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 being the worst possible doctor and 10 being the best possible doctor. The score shows how often patients gave the doctor a 9 or 10.
2015 Patient Experience

N/A The number of surveys or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance

Willingness To Recommend Patients were asked if they would recommend the doctors office to their family and friends. The score shows how often patients answered Yes, definitely to this specific question.
2015 Patient Experience

N/A The number of surveys or providers is too small for purposes of reliably reporting performance