Wisconsin Collaborative for Quality Healthcare

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WCHQ Measures Summary Report

This report shows a health system's most current results for all WCHQ performance measures.

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* Benchmark: For those measures with multiple result categories displayed on one bar, the benchmark applies to "Good Control" for A1C Control and LDL Control measures, and to "Two or More Tests" for Blood Sugar (A1C) Testing. The default benchmark is the top performer. This can be changed by selecting a different benchmark from the drop-down.

** Rank: For those measures with multiple result categories displayed on one bar, the rank is based on "Good Control" for A1C Control and LDL Control measures, and to "Two or More Tests" for Blood Sugar (A1C) Testing.

 
Benchmark
Good Control
(or BMI Normal)
Fair to Poor
Control (or BMI
Above Normal)
Uncontrolled
(or BMI Below Normal)
Not Tested
 
Two or More Tests One Test  
 
Percentage of Patients Meeting the Measure Criteria  

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Fort HealthCare
Chronic Care  
Measure Rank **
Preventive Care  
Measure Rank **

Breast Cancer Screening There is convincing evidence that screening with film mammography reduces breast cancer mortality, with a greater absolute reduction for women aged 50 to 74 years than for women aged 40 to 49 years. The strongest evidence for the greatest benefit is among women aged 60 to 69 years. Among women 75 years or older, evidence of benefits of mammography is lacking.Recommended intervals for mammography screening may also vary on an individual basis, but there is a general consensus that every two years is the minimum frequency. However, it is recommended that women speak with their health care providers to determine on an individual basis the age at which to begin and end mammography screening and the frequency of these screenings. For women who have had sporadic breast cancer the evidence supports regular history, physical examination, and mammography as the cornerstone of appropriate breast cancer follow-up. Women treated with breast-conserving therapy should have their first post-treatment mammogram no earlier than 6 months after definitive radiation therapy. Subsequent mammograms should be obtained every 6 to 12 months for surveillance of abnormalities. Mammography should be performed yearly if stability of mammographic findings is achieved after completion of loco regional therapy.This measure assesses the percentage of women age 50 through 74 who had a minimum of one breast cancer screening test during the two year measurement period
Q3 2015 - Q2 2017 N=3,386

24
of 25
68.52%
68.52%

Cervical Cancer Screening There is good evidence that cervical cancer screening significantly reduces the incidence of and mortality from cervical cancer. The US Preventive Services Task Force suggests most of the benefit can be obtained by beginning screening at age 21. Recommendations include screening for women ages 21 through 64 with cytology (Pap smear) at least every 3 years and for women ages 30 through 64 who want to lengthen the screening interval, screening with a combination of cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 5 years. An individuals specific clinical considerations, risk factors, etc. determine if testing is needed at a more frequent interval. It is recommended that women speak with their health care providers to determine the appropriate interval for their particular situation. There is limited evidence to determine the benefits of continued screening in women older than 65, due to declining incidence of high-grade cervical lesions after middle age. There is fair evidence that screening women older than 65 is associated with an increased risk for potential harm (US Preventive Services Task Force). Therefore, it is also recommended that women over age 65 speak with their health care providers to determine if continued screening is appropriate for their personal medical condition.
Q3 2014 - Q2 2017 N=5,706

24
of 25
72.08%
72.08%

Colorectal Cancer Screening The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) strongly recommends that clinicians screen men and women, at age 50 and older for colorectal cancer. The optimal interval for screening depends on the test. Annual fecal occult blood testing (FOBT)/Fecal Immunoassay Test (FIT) offers greater reductions in mortality rates than biennial screening. A 10-year interval has been recommended for colonoscopy, but a 5-year interval is recommended for flexible sigmoidoscopies because of their lower sensitivity. Fecal DNA Screening (Cologuard test) has been added as a new option for screening in 2015 (recommended interval every three years). The USPSTF concluded that the benefits from screening for colorectal cancer substantially outweigh potential harms, and that regardless of screening strategy chosen, it is likely to be cost-effective. In persons identified as being at high-risk by their health care providers, initiating screening at an earlier age is reasonable. It is recommended that all adults speak with their health care providers to determine, on an individual basis, the age at which to begin and end screenings, the best type of screening for individual circumstances, and the frequency of these screenings.
Q3 2016 - Q2 2017 N=6,102

21
of 24
69.50%
69.50%