Wisconsin Collaborative for Quality Healthcare

View Our Reports

print this page

WCHQ Measures Summary Report

This report shows a health system's most current results for all WCHQ performance measures.

Health System Selection:


Clinic Selection:

Legend

* Benchmark: For those measures with multiple result categories displayed on one bar, the benchmark applies to "Good Control" for A1C Control and LDL Control measures, and to "Two or More Tests" for Blood Sugar (A1C) Testing. The default benchmark is the top performer. This can be changed by selecting a different benchmark from the drop-down.

** Rank: For those measures with multiple result categories displayed on one bar, the rank is based on "Good Control" for A1C Control and LDL Control measures, and to "Two or More Tests" for Blood Sugar (A1C) Testing.

 
Benchmark
Good Control
(or BMI Normal)
Fair to Poor
Control (or BMI
Above Normal)
Uncontrolled
(or BMI Below Normal)
Not Tested
 
Two or More Tests One Test  
 
Percentage of Patients Meeting the Measure Criteria  

Btn Export

Show Benchmark *:

Sauk Prairie Healthcare
Chronic Care  
Measure Rank **

Diabetes: Blood Sugar (A1c) Testing Good glycemic control for people with diabetes is cost-effective and improves quality of life. The A1c test has become the gold standard for assessing and monitoring glycemic control. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) strongly recommends that people with diabetes have two A1c tests annually, at a minimum. This measure assesses the percentage of patients 18 to 75 years of age with a diagnosis of diabetes who had two or more A1c tests, one A1c test, or no A1c tests within the measurement year.
Q3 2016 - Q2 2017 N=446

24
of 25

Diabetes: Kidney Function Monitored Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease in the United States. Early detection and intervention, along with improved glycemic and blood pressure control, can help reduce the risk of the development and progression of kidney disease. The measure shows the percent of people 18 to 75 years of age with a diagnosis of diabetes who were screened and/or monitored for kidney disease in the measurement year.
Q3 2016 - Q2 2017 N=446

25
of 25
76.46%
76.46%
Preventive Care  
Measure Rank **

Colorectal Cancer Screening The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) strongly recommends that clinicians screen men and women, at age 50 and older for colorectal cancer. The optimal interval for screening depends on the test. Annual fecal occult blood testing (FOBT)/Fecal Immunoassay Test (FIT) offers greater reductions in mortality rates than biennial screening. A 10-year interval has been recommended for colonoscopy, but a 5-year interval is recommended for flexible sigmoidoscopies because of their lower sensitivity. Fecal DNA Screening (Cologuard test) has been added as a new option for screening in 2015 (recommended interval every three years). The USPSTF concluded that the benefits from screening for colorectal cancer substantially outweigh potential harms, and that regardless of screening strategy chosen, it is likely to be cost-effective. In persons identified as being at high-risk by their health care providers, initiating screening at an earlier age is reasonable. It is recommended that all adults speak with their health care providers to determine, on an individual basis, the age at which to begin and end screenings, the best type of screening for individual circumstances, and the frequency of these screenings.
Q3 2016 - Q2 2017 N=3,361

23
of 24
68.91%
68.91%